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Tagged: “Operations”

Peter Robertson of RP’s Pasta On Managing Growth And Changing With The Consumer

Peter Robertson of RP’s Pasta On Managing Growth And Changing With The Consumer

RP’s Pasta is now part of the portfolio of brands of Tribe 9 Foods. One of founder Peter Robertson’s first challenges was category placement as a fresh, refrigerated pasta. RP’s started moving with the consumer to come up with flavors that were non-traditional in Northern Italy, including unique flavors and ingredients. A trip to Expo West in 2010 validated the demand and uniqueness of their gluten-free SKUs, generating demand that spawned rapid growth of RP’s on a more national level. Managing growth and matching it with the right equipment setup/space has also proven a challenge. Peter had mostly funded RP’s with free cash flow and bank financing until accepting the help of an outside investor during their rapid growth phase. In 2017, RP’s merged with Yumbutter and Ona Treats to form Tribe 9 foods, forming a portfolio of brands with a co-packing line of business in a new facility big enough to house the in-house manufacturing for all three companies. Peter expects Tribe 9 to experience tremendous growth over next 5 years, especially in the growth of their private label and contract manufacturing lines of business.

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Great Food Entrepreneurs Are Always Learning

Great Food Entrepreneurs Are Always Learning

We have found that the best entrepreneurs are constantly seeking new learning experiences. This includes getting constant feedback from their customers, to reaching out to potential mentors for advice, to attending industry events and tradeshows to network with and learn from their peers and industry veterans. Sometimes, learning means “un-learning” something these entrepreneurs thought was essential to their business when they launched, whether their packaging or messaging or even their original business model. In short, good food entrepreneurs learn to adapt and know that some of their original assumptions will be proven wrong as they validate their products in the market.

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This Food Hub Leverages A Diverse Food Shed For A Resilient Future

This Food Hub Leverages A Diverse Food Shed For A Resilient Future

Dorchester’s Farm Food Hub, a for-profit cooperative located in Prince County, Maryland serving the Chesapeake Bay food shed. The Hub aggregates and tries to ensure consistent supply of seafood and farm products (fruit, produce, livestock) and then redistributes to areas that are historically under-served via direct delivery of fresh and healthy food options. The Hub gives its customers lots of choice and flexibility, allowing people to chose what they purchase based on availability and their preferences. They started with 20 members in 2014 and are now up to nearly 500 consistent members in 2018. The average order size for their products is about $57 and 2 products. The Hub keeps consistent data on their customers’ preferences and has developed new products, like chicken plates and coleslaw, to both eliminate unnecessary waste in their operations and improve their bottom line through producing of value-added products and adding customers to existing delivery routes. The Hub has sought to further leverage their strategic advantages of seafood and aggregation services as their biggest points of differentiation in the marketplace.

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Where Does My Food Brand Need To “Be”?

Where Does My Food Brand Need To “Be”?

There are wide variety of tools and marketplaces to reach customers for today’s food brands. And, sometimes the ideal distribution path looks different than the entrepreneur intended when they started the business. The brands that survive today’s marketplace will be making decisions about distribution and channels of delivery with their customers’ expectations and preferences center stage.

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Building A Defensibly Unique Food Supply Chain

Building A Defensibly Unique Food Supply Chain

There are many ways to make your food company be defensibly unique. This can include building an innovative brand that speaks to consumers that weren’t being spoken to before and stands out in its category or categories. This could mean developing a proprietary technology or process that allows you to make truly unique products. This could mean sourcing unique ingredients from a known and understood supply chain. However, what if they supply chain didn’t already exist? Could you build a supply chain that is defensibly unique? Building markets and the supply chain relationships necessary to support them requires a long-term vision that aligns consumers, suppliers, funders and their brand. But, if it is properly built and capitalized, it can lead to a defensibly unique business model that allows that food company to be built to last.

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Growing A Successful Retail Food Co-op By Meeting Your Member’s Needs

Growing A Successful Retail Food Co-op By Meeting Your Member’s Needs

The Great Basin Community Food Co-op serves the Reno, Nevada area. The co-op started as a private buying club and was initially located in the back of a punk record store, but continued to grow their sales and members. In 2008, they opened to the public in downtown Reno with 500 feet of retail space, eventually hitting $1 million in sales in one year. In 2012 they moved to another 3-story location of about 3,000 square feet (on the main floor) even closer to downtown. In 2017, the store had about $4.5 million in sales after rapid growth in previous years. The best way for aspiring co-ops to be successful is by reaching out to their community and meeting their members’ needs. In addition, co-ops should focus on their honing their core priorities so that so they don’t get off track, building capacity and buy-in with a core group of people.

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Rightsizing The Ship: A Farmer’s Tale of Scaling Down

Rightsizing The Ship: A Farmer’s Tale of Scaling Down

Rufus Haucke is the owner of Keewaydin Farms, a 200-acre diversified organic vegetable farm that also works aggregating local farmer’s produce in a distribution business. The business’ sales peaked in 2012 at over $800,000 with Rufus coordinating production from over 100 different producers (including his own farm) throughout the season. However, he discovered that the bigger the business got, the more money it lost and that his moving aggregation functions off of his farm caused his operation to be less efficient at that level of sales. Now he had a decision to make: expand rapidly, likely to $2 million – $3 million in sales, or contract. He chose to contract. This has meant he still owes many of those suppliers money, one of the most difficult things about his decision. But, he has remained in open and honest communication with those producers and has focused on rebuilding relationships with them while right sizing the business to achieve profitability.

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Midwestern BioAg and The Business of Biological Farming

Midwestern BioAg and The Business of Biological Farming

Biological farming is treating your farm like an ecosystem and preserving the long-term health of the soil. Midwestern BioAg is a company that provides farmers with consulting and products (mostly inputs) that help their farm’s yields, resiliency and profitability by using biological farming methods i.e. treating your farm like an ecosystem and preserving the long-term health of the soil. While the company started focused on small dairy producers (50-400 cows in a herd), their customers now include large farms and vegetable producers.

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Considering In-House Food Manufacturing? Waste Can Be A Resource That Improves Your Bottom Line

Considering In-House Food Manufacturing? Waste Can Be A Resource That Improves Your Bottom Line

Zero Waste Facility Certification can improve food businesses’ bottom lines while helping them meet existing standards for building design, construction and operations. LEED and Zero Waste Facility Certification also give them a framework to exceed standards where it makes business sense. For example, when Tera Johnson (the Edible-Alpha® podcast host) built a whey protein processing plant for teraswhey®, capturing waste heat from the boiler to preheat the drier made both environmental and business sense because it saved money and because those practices resonated with teraswhey®’s target consumer.

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