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Tagged: “Business Models”

Ownership Differentiates Willy Street Co-op In A Changing Grocery Market

Ownership Differentiates Willy Street Co-op In A Changing Grocery Market

Willy Street Co-op is a set of cooperatively owned retail grocery stores in Madison, WI. Founded in 1974, they now have 35,000 member-owners and about 400 employees across three stores. This last fiscal year, the co-op generated about $52 million in sales, making them one of the largest grocery co-ops in the country. The grocery market has changed with changing consumer tastes and habits over the past several years, with everything from store size to product mix needing to adapt. Retail grocery co-ops have struggled at times to find their niche in a marketplace where local and organic/natural products are more widely available at traditional grocery stores and online. They have found that operating transparently and openly, emphasizing cooperative ownership and owner literacy, has provided a point of differentiation for Willy Street Co-op in the current marketplace.

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ReGrained, A Business Model For The Long Term And The Planet

ReGrained, A Business Model For The Long Term And The Planet

ReGrained is a national brand of bars and ready-to-eat snacks made from the high-protein and high-fiber flour of “spent” grains used in the beer brewing process. Their core bar product went through many iterations before being ready to scale, and since the bar category is crowded and competitive, it was a learning process to get trial and educate the consumer. ReGrained launched their product at scale in January 2018 and now are working with other businesses to help them produce/co-brand new products using their production facility and the expertise embedded in their proprietary process. They are building out a commercial scale facility that they call a “ReGrainery” in Berkeley, CA currently to process the flour for their bars and demonstrate the re-grained concept to the public. ReGrained was self-funded early on through a small start up investment and cash from product sales, though they have since raised funds via rewards-based crowdfunding, friends and family, angel investment, and equity-based crowdfunding, in addition to a new strategic partnership. The team at ReGrained is excited about their business model being defensibly unique in today’s marketplace and their business model’s long-term impact on the planet.

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Grow Your Food Brand On Amazon, If You Constantly Optimize

Grow Your Food Brand On Amazon, If You Constantly Optimize

The Amazon platform provides a means for small and emerging brands to find an audience and generate sales if they dedicate time and resources to ensure discoverability on the platform by constantly optimizing product pages with the right keywords and features once the user is on the page, in addition to paying for keyword-based advertising. Many food and beverage brands have found that they need to sell variety packs or other bundles to get their products to the $10 – $20 price point that is optimal for both what consumers are looking to pay while balancing achieving profitability on each unit that is not possible with selling individual products for less than $10. While there are some perishable products available through Amazon Fresh or Amazon Prime Now, the brands that have the most traction today in selling through Amazon tend to have shelf-stable products.

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The Farmer Education Continuum In The Colorado Mountains

The Farmer Education Continuum In The Colorado Mountains

The Old Fort at Hesperus’ team sees farming education as a continuum where different people are best served by discreet programs, depending on their interests and stage of development. Their sustainable agriculture program includes an educational garden internship, a farmer-in-training program, and market garden incubator. The incubator program provides educational classes, mentorship, access to land, water, infrastructure (irrigation, harvest sheds, cooler and root cellar), and marketing assistance to aspiring farmers who are either in business or ready to start their own farming business. Their Education Garden is a ½ acre production and demonstration garden devoted to giving Fort Lewis College interns an introduction to small-scale sustainable farming through about 120-150 hours of hands-on work. In addition, their Farmer-in-Training (FIT) program is a stepping-stone between an internship and owning an independent business selling produce.

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How Tribe 9 Foods Balances Economies Of Scale With A Changing Marketplace

How Tribe 9 Foods Balances Economies Of Scale With A Changing Marketplace

Tribe 9 Foods is the result of merging Yumbutter, RP’s Pasta and Ona Treats. The new company also secured growth capital to bring manufacturing in-house for all three brands, something that has allowed them to have control over batch timing, batch size and product quality. In addition, in-house production allows them the flexibility to try new things and have a co-packing line of business for their core product types (nut butters, pasta, bars). Yumbutter’s team brings experience in branding/marketing and RP’s team brings experience in innovative food manufacturing and food safety protocols, allowing them to combine flexibility with economies of scale while serving multiple types of customers with their co-packing service. Tribe 9 is always looking to be flexible and nimble, diversifying as the market changes and as everyone tries to figure out a more sustainable way to produce and distribute high quality food.

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How Union Kitchen’s Ecosystem Helps Build Profitable Food Businesses

How Union Kitchen’s Ecosystem Helps Build Profitable Food Businesses

Union Kitchen is a shared-use kitchen and food business accelerator in in Washington D.C. While having a shared-use kitchen eliminates the need for capital for kitchen equipment, there are many other things food businesses need to raise capital for, which why they have distribution and retail outlets as part of their model. Their vertically integrated business and infrastructure – the kitchen, distribution and retail outlets – pairs with its accelerator program, which includes technical assistance, mentorship, classes and other means to help its members be successful. They have worked with over 400 businesses that have hired over 1,000 people and of those 400, 80 have opened their own storefronts. The financial community is more willing to provide capital to their member businesses because their ecosystem has allowed their members to prove that their products have traction in the marketplace and their operations are solid.

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Rightsizing The Ship: A Farmer’s Tale of Scaling Down

Rightsizing The Ship: A Farmer’s Tale of Scaling Down

Rufus Haucke is the owner of Keewaydin Farms, a 200-acre diversified organic vegetable farm that also works aggregating local farmer’s produce in a distribution business. The business’ sales peaked in 2012 at over $800,000 with Rufus coordinating production from over 100 different producers (including his own farm) throughout the season. However, he discovered that the bigger the business got, the more money it lost and that his moving aggregation functions off of his farm caused his operation to be less efficient at that level of sales. Now he had a decision to make: expand rapidly, likely to $2 million – $3 million in sales, or contract. He chose to contract. This has meant he still owes many of those suppliers money, one of the most difficult things about his decision. But, he has remained in open and honest communication with those producers and has focused on rebuilding relationships with them while right sizing the business to achieve profitability.

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Scaling Innovative Food Products At The Right Time

Scaling Innovative Food Products At The Right Time

Shari Leidich, founder of Know Brainer, started down the path of being a serial entrepreneur when she found out she had Multiple Sclerosis (MS). She turned her love for healthy, sprouted raw whole foods that helped mitigate her MS into products under the brand Two Moms in the Raw (now Soul Sprout). Shortly after she left Two Moms in 2016, she began to experiment with incorporating grass-fed ghee and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) oil into consumer products like individual creamers. The ideal market for their individual creamer products has been online with Amazon and their own online store while their multi-serve product is more of a conventional grocery item. Shari reflected that she knows more about how to grow the business the 2nd time around. Now that the company is growth mode, they are seeking investment. But, they are ensuring their product has traction and their processes are tight before partnering with investors, and that has meant saying no to some potential opportunities, at least for the time being.

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MobCraft Beer’s Creative Sourcing of Recipes and Financing

MobCraft Beer’s Creative Sourcing of Recipes and Financing

MobCraft beer is a brewery and taproom with a unique business model of crowdsourcing ideas for beer recipes from their customers. Their brewery/taproom in Milwaukee cost just over $2 million to build. When MobCraft first started to raise money to finance their facility, they looked for institutional capital at first without much success and then pursued equity crowdfunding. Knowing how much equity they needed vs. debt to finance their facility build out and equipment needs helped them pitch specific asks to both banks and investors. They took advantage of the SBA 7a program to raise the debt they needed, talking to multiple banks before securing bank financing. They also worked with the landlord of their facility to help finance the improvements to the space, which worked as equity when approaching the bank. They then strategically sold their distribution rights to help raise cash.

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Growing Madison Sourdough Intentionally Through Vertical Integration

Growing Madison Sourdough Intentionally Through Vertical Integration

Dave Lohrentz is co-owner of Madison Sourdough, a bakery, café, patisserie and mill in Madison, WI specializing in sourdough breads. They have grown using a vertically integrated business model by adding a restaurant that highlights their baked goods and bakery. They have also added an artisanal grain mill to their production processes, sourcing much of the flour themselves from local producers. Dave has found it is difficult to get the local and unconventional grain supply chain to a robust enough point to have options for multiple actors in the chain. He advocates for entrepreneurs to use the lean startup model of trying things, talking to customers, learning from mistakes and pivoting quickly, rather than writing up elaborate business plans built on assumptions that may not be true and may change over time.

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